About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
WETA 41
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
gains. s&p strategist sam stovall joins us with where he sees stocks headed in 2013. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! washington lawmakers are getting close to a fiscal cliff deal, but they might not get it done before the midnight deadline tonight. the senate could vote in time, but it's possible the house will wait until tuesday. that means the u.s. could go over the fiscal cliff. on wall street today, investors bought up stocks on high hopes of deal, after president obama said this afternoon a deal is "in sight," and positive comments from republican leaders in the senate. here's how e major averagesr closed on this last trading day of 2012. the dow surged 166 points, the nasdaq jumped about 60, and the s&p rose almost 24 points. while wall street has already closed the books on 2012, washington still has a few hours to go before its new year's day fiscal cliff deadline. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: after a weekend of late-night negotiations with the vice presidt, senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said an agreement on the fiscal cliff was very, very close.
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome anne lamott to the program. her latest project is called, i love this, "help, thanks, wow: the three essential prayers." i love the title. i love the book. i love the packaging. i love the layout. >> thank you. tavis: it packs a powerful punch. how're people responding to a run the country? >> great, but i brought to a little something, a present for you when your mother. i brought a present. this is for you. this is a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get over-excited. tavis: i do that. i want to get right into this. i
the embargo's lifted. thomas herzfeld, of thomas herzfled advisors joins us. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! president obama says he's "modestly optimistic" a fiscal deal can be reached in time. he said he's instructed senator harry reid and senator mitch mcconnell to come up with a plan that can pass in congress. his brief comments a short while ago came after a white house meeting today with congressional leaders that ended with no deal. ahead of that, investors st hope lawmakers can come together in the time remaining. in the last few minutes of trading, stocks sold off. the dow tumbled 158 points, the nasdaq lost 25, and the s&p fell over 15 points. here's darren gersh with more on the critical work that has to get done in washington this weekend. >> reporter: the president declared himself modestly optimistic congress could still reach an agreement to head off huge tax hikes on january first, but he also warned lawmakers to get their work done. >> the american people are not going to have patience with a self-inflicted wound on the economy. >> reporter: senate republican leader m
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: how about that? it is called detroit, a grinning when the -- a grammy-winning jazz artists. he worked with the late great miles davis. in just a bit, another special performance. marcus miller, i am delighted to see you. >> i know exactly what you mean. tavis: the last time we talked was on my radio program, and you took off to go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people,
will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again.at but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq fromains.. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller t
who cannot do that tonight. and they need all of us right now. in the hard days to come that community needs us to be at our best as americans, and i will do everything in my power as president to help. because while nothing can fill the space of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need, to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, and that the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memory-- memories but also in ours. may god bless the memory of the victims. and in the words of scripture, heal the broken hearted, and bind up their wounds. >> rose: flags at the white house and the capitol are flying at half-mast in recognition of one of the worst school shootings in american history. the victims and their families are in our thoughts and prayers this evening as we air a program on a brain series about post traumatic stress disorder. after this break, our program on post traumatic disorder begins. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our stu
, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to be laid off worldwide, aake upe bout 4% of the company's workforce. more than 6,000 of those jobs are in consum
to put us on the course to fiscal discipline. >> we are running at a time. americans are threatened with a tax hike in just few hours. i hope we can keep in mind that our single most important goal is to protect middle-class families. >> democrats and republicans in congress have to get this done but they are not there yet. they are closed but not there yet. one thing we can count on with respect to this congress is that if there is even one second left, they will lose -- they will use that last second. >> the gap between the two sides is narrowing. time is running short. if a deal cannot be found, the eventual impact on americans will be severe. geeo the year, the ara family would pay an extra $2,000 in tax. there would be sharp cuts in spending across government operations. defense would be hit hard. with so much money coming out of the economy, america would face higher unemployment and probably effect of recession. >> the fiscal cliff is a series of spending cuts and tax rises. the uncertainty is already hurting the economy here and americans are angry. >> there is no reason the
also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the information minister and he repeated one of their official positions, which is that they say they
among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religious freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight for freedom" to highlight their concerns. faith-based groups continued to be divided over economic issues. conservative activists supported massive cuts to the federal budget, arguing that it's immoral to leave debt to future generations. but a broad-based interfaith coalition argued that it was immoral to make cuts that would hurt the poor. to underscore that point, a group of catholic sisters organized a project called "nuns on the bus," where they crisscrossed the country speaking out against the federal budget
us. we are failing. >> you really believe this story, osama bin laden? >> yeah. >> what convinced you. >> her confidence. >> if you're right, the whole world's going to want in on this. you will never find him. >> it is one of the few moments >> rose: this is movie journalism that snaps and stains and par fi the decades clamor and clutter into narrative clarity with a sale tree kick. joining me is scribe writer mark boal and director of zero dark thirty kathryn bigelowing i'm very please to do have them back at this table, welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: i don't know where to start. let me start with the idea of bin laden and his, and the search to find him. when did that get inside your brain so that you thought maybe maybe. >> sometime, i don't remember exactly when. >> rose: it was before hurt locker was it not. >> it was around then, and after hurt locker was finished we were talking about what the next picture might be. with a decided to focus on the attempt to kill bin laden in torabora in 2001 when special forces more or less had him in one square mile box. and the peas of t
holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving fla
. there of been those who have demonstrated against guns, but not a manufacturer of the weapon used to murder the children is under pressure. it was advertised as a prop to masculinity now the company within 95% stake in the firm is selling out because of this watershed event. just outside town, there are four rows of empty shelves. they have taken the guns off the market out of respect. but more important, it is part of a chain of around 200 jobs throughout the u.s. they all stopped selling the modern sporting rifles, as they're called. changes the law might be more difficult. >> there is no chance of a ban on handguns. the supreme court has ruled plans to outlaw them in chicago and washington d.c. are unconstitutional. the most likely move would be to ban military-style assault rifles, magazines holding numerous bullet. the president has backed such a bill. >> while he supports strongly an assault weapons ban and other measures, he wants to expand the conversation beyond those specific areas of legislation. >> i'm joe manchin -- >> the group of the gun hand -- of the gun ban will be loosene
last be enough. millions of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: on "meet the press" yesterday, at a press conference today you believe that the time is now, that this is the moment to act, and at the same time you are chastising the president for-- i believe the time was a long time ago, the president gave a speech after the massacre in a-- aurora, colorado, saying we have to do something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virgini
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. th and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement ca
' struggles. where whatever's happening to the gay community, is happening to us. whatever's happening in the asian community, that's us. instead of possessive commodified investment in our identities, we need to take possessive investment in our other communities' struggles. >> the life and work of junot diaz contain many worlds, and that makes him all the more worth listening to. his imagination travels between the old and the new, between the america that was and the america we're becoming. straddling different cultures, yet american to the core -- he seems to be looking in every direction at once -- a spotter of the future, a curator of the past, a man very much of the here and now. in his first book, "drown" and in "the brief wondrous life of oscar wao" -- the novel that won him the pulitzer prize, diaz writes in short, vivid strokes of realspeak. his recent collection of short stories, "this is how you lose her," was a finalist for the national book award. diaz, the novelist, once considered becoming an historian and to this day he summons his creative gifts by looking to his own
years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the white house had a new proposal on the table today in the fiscal cliff negotiations. house republicans said it fell well short, but the two sides kept at it, hoping to avert across-the-board tax hikes and steep mandatory spending cuts in 2013. >> we're moving closer. let me say that. it looks more encouraging today than it did yesterday. >> woodruff: there were some voices today like california republican congressman wally herger who saw s onsf a dal in the works. president obama offered monday erow lowis target for new revenue to $1.2 trillion over ten years. down $400 billion from f hisstit offer. he aolso raised the threshold fr higher tax rates to household
bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season that should have been alive with the joy of children is now, instead, a season of mourning their loss in newtown, connecticut. the first of the funerals took place today for the victims of the massacre at an elementary school. ray suarez begins our coverage. >> suarez: flowers streamed into funeral homes around newtown as the shock and horror of friday gave way to grim rituals of grief mourners in black waited under gray skies to attend services for jack pinto and noah, 20 of the... two of the 20 first graders killed at sandy hook elementary. townspeople are still reeling. >> really sad. i didn't want to go back t
to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of a man born in obscurity in whose name a faith was made. >> narrator: we know so little about him-- that he was born more than 2,000 years ago, and that he lived in palestine. we know he was baptized and became a preacher. and we know that he was publicly executed. >> ( dramatized ): what manner of man is this that even the winds and the seas obey him? >> narrator: with so little evidence to go by, archaeologists must sift the clues, and scholars decode the stories told by the first followers of jesus. >> the problem for any historian in trying to reconstruct the life of jesus is simply that we don't have sources that come from the actual time of jesus himself. >> the historian's task in understanding jesus and the jesus movement and early christianity is a lot like the archaeologist's task in excavating a tell. you peel back layer after layer after layer of interpretation, and what you always find is a plurality of jesuses. >> history isn't made to record the deeds of a person like jesus. jesus is very much like most peop
hunting. >> i think if we do see a sell- off were going to use that as opportunity to step and at least put a little bit of sideline money that our clients have and they have a lot to work. >> reporter: wren has no hesitation recommending his clients use any dip as a buying opportunity. that's because he's confident there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff in janaury. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from grandma's cookies to holiday gifts for the little ones, still ahead we're riding along with u.p.s. as the shipping giant kicks off its busiest week of the year. >> tom: two mildly encouraging words were used by a group of economists to describe what next year may bring: stable and moderate. that's the 2013 outlook from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporati profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely
victory investment. apple didn't say where in the u.s. the line of mac computers would be built or how many jobs might be included. now the return of apple to u.s. manufacturing comes as shareholders have experienced a very rocky ride in the past few months. the stock is down 22% from its all-time high in september. suzanne pratt reports. rtses. >> reporter: a peak inside this manhattan apple store and it looks like everything is a-okay. plenty of customer, plenty of purchases. so why has the shine come off apple's shares? with a-- in a word, actually two, profit-taking. >> i think the biggest reason for the selling going back to when it was priced $700 in september is pure profit-taking. if you look from the beginning year to september, the stock was up 74%. so i think you had some natural profit-taking. >> reporter: but this isn't ode year-end selling by institutions looking to record nice numbers. this supposedly is fiscal cliff related selling as shareholders worries that capital gains tax rates will be higher next year. >> still, financial planner sharon appleman says selli
the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is an inappropriate metaphor. and it does conjure u
right now, to us it is the decision of communities gathering together and realizing that they have a voice and a responsibility to sort of unite and engage in these issues that are happening each day and deciding for themselves whether they want it. >> i forgot what it was like to start from, you know, the open laptop and that was just really fun, i just, my wife said to me in the middle of the whole thing, she says no matter what happens if you never make this movie, i haven't seen you this happy, at least remember how much fun it is to write. >> rose: a look at the economy and a look at the movies when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the slreno captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an assessment of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama
of music is at that time, not violently just what is successful now, most of it doesn't mean anything to us. we have to make our own music, we have to make music for our generation, for our friends. >> rose: right. >> and it is not -- we are going to wipe the slate clean. >> rose: gustavo dudamel and david byrne when we continue. funding for charl ov provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about t
screen. >>> breaking news coming to us from singapore. in the past few minutes, it was just announced that the indian woman who was gang raped in delhi earlier this month that has caused national average has died. she was being treated at a hospital in singapore where she was on life-support. in india, her brutal attack triggered nationwide protests. the authorities struggling to contain the growing anger. we have received a statement from a doctor, the chief executive of the hospital where she was being looked after. "we are very sad to report the patient passed away peacefully at 4: 40 5:00 a.m. today singapore time. her family and officials from the high commission of india were at her side. we join her family in mourning her loss. the patient had remained in extremely critical condition since admission to hospital from the morning of december 27. despite all efforts by a team of eight specialists in the hospital to keep per staple, her condition continued to deteriorate over the past two days. she suffered from severe organ failure suffering serious injuries to her body and brain.
of the funerals of the 26 people killed in america's deadliest school shootings. in response, the u.s. lawmakers about action. tipping point?he >> this is an outrage. we are killing each other. we are the only industrialized country in the world of doing it. to >> at least nine afghan girls are killed by a landmine while collecting firewood. it raises questions about these weapons of war. >> welcome to this special edition of "bbc world news america." this community is warning the loss of 26 people including 20 children killed in a school on friday. it has ignited a debate about gun control in america. today was about the children, i got little noah and little jack pinto, to six girls who were buried today. it should a community struggling with grief and with shock. we have the latest. >> the agony of this week town was almost unbearable. first jack pinto was also buried. the town will hold the funerals of 80 more small victims of horrific violence. the parents of one of them have been speaking of their desperation as they waited outside the school on friday. >> i know exactly what she was weari
clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actually potentially constructive. and every faction is sending their groups into the streets, or the muslim brotherhood is sending dogs to intimidate the court. this could create a very tense situation and potentially spiral out of control. >> how accurate are those comments about morsi? >> we do not know yet. none of those statements necessarily mean there is anything other than competition. you have the court stopped with mubarak appointees, but nonetheless, you have the other branches of government. . there's also the definition of the future of egyptian society. >> i was interested to see what you were writing about on
. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but america forgets quickly and gives no lasting indication it seems redemption from its fetish with guns, its romance with the free market of violence, with the sport of it all. the show must go on. it's our right. at any price. what were their names again? oh, yes. charlotte, daniel, olivia, daniel, allison, dawn. poor things. such a tragedy. praise the lord and pass the ammunition. so we make our peace with violence and make ourselves over in its image. a state senator in missouri, a lifetime member of the national rifle association, is pushing a bill to require that all first graders be enrolled in
wear. >> my obituary. >> what would you want us to say? would music be in the first sentence or two? >> no, i will say exactly what i said to the meerning extras. many singers. here lies ricardo muti, a crazy man that spent all his life trying to find a correct qafer or quarter note. >> rose: in pursuit of that your life was. >> that is a disaster. >> rose: but music has been good to you. >> very, very good. you know, music is the only art. and i know this by experience that can bring people together. and make people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing
have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome richard gere to this program. the talented actor and tireless human rights advocate stars in a new film out now called "arbitrage." the movie is the story of a troubled hedge fund manager and also stars susan sarandon and tim roth, so here now a scene from "arbitrage." >> everybody wins, if we sell the company. if i live for you. >> you don't have to live. you didn't know about it. that is why didn't tell you. >> that will take away my brokerage license. delmar to supervisor chu. my name in every paper. -- failure to supervise you. >> because it is my job. >> it is illegal, and i am your partner. >> you are not my partner. you work for me. that's right, you work for me. everybody works for me. tavis: i have been so anxious to talk to you. thank you for coming. >> no, it's a great pleasure. tavis: oh, we've done some radio before, but never on television. >> we
in the customers' perspective. >> it used to be just you have no cook, be a very good chef and i thought i was the last -- when i started cooking i saw the last of this age of the great chef where you had to be the greatest technician. now it's not like that anymore because once you became the greatest technician you didn't have the ability to open up your own restaurant anymore. and things started to change. in the '90s there were five or six restaurants where if you wanted to learn about cooking you had to work there. and now that's not the case anymore. and i have just the utmost respect for the old school tradition, the history behind it and everybody that's done it the right way and it -- i have a hard time justifying my place with that world. >> cooking is a simple equation, no matter if it's fine dining at our level, casual dining or fast food. it's about product, about execution. so, yes, you need to have that quality product and you need to have people who can execute it. so it's really trying to bring those two together, that strong team that has a common vision, a common goal an
the heat of the debate, to election night, the political divide wydened. the u.s. re-examined its role abroad and a second term president claimed it. we look ahead to what happens next with michael duffy of "time" magazine. john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times" and karen tumulty of "the washington post." >> covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital. this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate fuppeding for "washington week" is provided by -- -- corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here, to chart a greern path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- pru
young could leave us, and such a peaceful community, such an horrific event. >> another massacre and another called for gun-control. >> the fact of this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> hands brawl after the state department report on benghazi, but are they the right hands? >> the compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. >> will former republican senator chuck hagel make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did not have sufficient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement on thursday evening as he stood in front of the house republican conference on thursday night, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me the serenity to accept the things that i cannot change, and close the house for business until after christmas. there is no place like an empty house for the holidays. his plan b died. >> let me be clear, speaker boehner's plans are nonstarters in the senate.
and the president are already using disasters and war spending as loopholes to avoid making tough cuts. >> they are doing that on the one side, then proposing additional stimulus spending on the other side, and then claiming that sometime next year they'll come up with some savings. that's a very troubling formula to me. >> reporter: if a grand bargain doesn't come together in the next few days, we may fall off the fiscal cliff and then wait for a new congress to put the pieces back together in the new year. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: well, roger altman is confident democrats and republicans will strike a deal and avoid falling off the fiscal cliff. he was deputy treasury secretary in the clinton administration and is now executive chairman and founder of evercore partners. >> susie: roger, so great to have you back on "nightly business report." >> thank you, susie. >> susie: nice to see you. why are you so optmistic there is going to be a fiscal cliff deal? >> i would cite two broad reasons, and then a few reasons specific to the negotiations. first on the broadside
going to do to address it. i think it will be real shame if people use this race political opportunity to push an agenda they have always had, gun control being an example. try to use the emotion of the nation right now to address it. i will tell you i'm encouraged by some of the polling i've seen on this, the american public seems to be taking a very hard look at it you, saying, you what, we should maybe have stricter gun laws but one says only about 28% thought that would have fixed the issue here. most of them think addressing the mental health issue in addition to violence and video games are also part of it. there's a lot to debate but i think we have to be very careful that we don't blame one party or the other if we're really going to have a sane, thoughtful and helpful discussion to try to prevent things like this in the future. >> what do you think needs to be done? >> i think right now we have public opinion very much on our side and i think that's because of the frequency of the shooting we've seen. there is representative gabby giffords last year, the movie theater. now we'
, burlington, vermont, we used to hold press conferences. you would have four or five or six different radio stations showing up. you know, we'd be talking about the school board or the city council local issues. now if we're lucky we'll have one radio station showing up. and that's true all over the united states of america. and the point he is not right wing or even left wing. the point is that the tendency of corpoporate america is not t discuss at length the real issues that impact ordinary people. if you owned a television station, for example, do you think you'd be talking about the impact that citizens united has on the american political system, when you're receiving huge amounts of money because of citizens united? if you are general electric, which has been a major outsourcer of jobs to china and other countries, do you think you're going to be talking about trade policy in the united states of america or maybe nuclear power in the united states of america? >> but this puzzles me. the fcc tried to do essentially the same thing four years ago, as you know, in the last year of the bu
wealthy among us. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and further reforms and entitlements that i'm prepared to make, that we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> rose: and the president talking about the link when our economic circumstance and our national security. >> the most important thing we do for national security though, is to get our economy on track. and we are in a very strong position. as i travel around the world, it's fascinating. european leaders, asian leaders, they all say to me, america actually is poorest to be the world leader for another century. if we can fix some of this political dysfunction. and there are some very simple steps that we can take. number one, let's not raise taxes on middle class families. that's something we could do right now. number two, let's have a sma
is simply not telling the truth. that made the romney/ryan people uncomfortable. it ought to make all of us uncomfortable because he was the only leader who said that this year. >> we showed a little clip of the 47% thing, secretly recorded. do we have a favorite political gas? >> the president saying -- it did not cost him the election -- it should have -- saying if you have a business, you did not build that. people argue about the syntax, but if you look at the context of a demon the government built roads and bridges and all that, which i thought was pretty telling about the way he views government versus the private sector. that is my nominee -- well, romney's was the most devastating because it reinforced a stereotype that obama had spent a lot of money doing in ads, and after that, he really could not shake it. >> what about binders full of women recruiting for him when he was governor of massachusetts? >> i think he topped that post- election with his description of obama winning because of the gifts that he gave. >> that was after the election. i am just wondering about the impact
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)